Letters to the Editor

Harber impugned Bob Beauprez’s integrity and character by comparing him to Scott McInnis

Dear Editor,

I beg your pardon! Comparing Scott McInnis and Bob Beauprez is ludicrous. McInnis’ problems are the result of character flaws, whereas the political environment and outside factors contributed as much to Congressman Beauprez’s election outcome as any policy issues or campaign strategy. 

In the many years I have known Congressman Beauprez, never has anyone had the temerity to impugn his character as Mr. Aaron Harber has just done in the July 23 issue of The Statesman. 

Bruce Benson or Hank Brown are the Republican Party’s only hope in this year’s Governor’s race

Dear Editor,

While I have sometimes admired Tom Tancredo for standing up for what he politically believes in, I rarely have agreed with his conclusions. But in Colorado’s race for governor he has recently challenged both the Republican Party primary candidates, Scott McInnis and Dan Maes, to drop out of the race after the August 10th primary if they are tailing the Democratic challenger John Hickenlooper.

What do Jane Norton and Sarah Brady have in common? They both want gun owners in jail!

Dear Editor,

Jane Norton claims to be pro-gun.

And though we’ve been skeptical of Jane Norton — especially considering she was recruited by one of the leading anti-gun Senators in the U.S. Senate — we decided to give her the benefit of the doubt.

She even joined her opponent, Ken Buck, in filling out the National Association for Gun Rights 2010 Federal Candidate Survey 100 percent pro-gun.

But right now, Jane Norton is acting more like radical gun-banner Sarah Brady.

The underlying protectionism by the state legislature is a clear violation of the Interstate Commerce Clause of the Constitution

Dear Editor,

In your July 9, 2010 article, “Lawsuit filed over recent Internet sales tax bill,” Rep. Jack Pommer mistakenly tries to connect Direct Marketing Association’s work on federal privacy legislation with DMA’s lawsuit against Colorado over the new law requiring retailers to report consumers’ online purchases to the Colorado Department of Revenue.

An honest effort is needed even in the Internet age

Dear Editor,

The recent discovery of the plagiarism committed by GOP gubernatorial candidate Scott McInnis over 20 years ago, bears out just how the “Internet Age” makes it easier to catch plagiarisms.

A story several years ago on NPR’s All Things Considered profiled a University of Virginia professor’s new innovation to catch Internet cheaters — a search engine that can locate patterns of phrasing and match them to other works. The device has already turned up a number of cheaters not only in academia, but also in other areas of our lives, e.g. the 2010 Governors race!

Reality doesn’t seem to be a word found in my critic’s vocabulary

Dear Colorado,

Dana Milbank got my name right — but that’s about it.

Government: Go after large corporations

Dear Editor,

I am appalled by the current lack of regulation across multiple industrial and financial sectors. We are all well aware of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, and lack of regulation in the oil industry.

Please, Doug Bruce must be stopped!

Dear Editor,

The city of Colorado Springs is the adopted hometown of right-wing crusader Doug Bruce. Thanks in part to local ballot initiatives sponsored by Bruce, restrictions on the ability of the city to meet basic needs have seriously harmed Colorado Springs — and adversely impacted the quality of life of every resident. The area’s chronic shortfalls for basic services like health inspectors, police and fire, and even street lights have repeatedly made national news.

AG says he’s not motivated by politics but his own words show otherwise

Dear Editor,

In a recent debate hosted by CU and DU law schools, Attorney General John Suthers defended “his practice of filing amicus briefs in support of one side or another in lawsuits not involving Colorado.”

Political consultants need to remember that no economy has ever been hurt by tax relief

Dear Editor,

On May 24, 2010, Rick Reiter, head of the campaign opposing the three tax relief ballot issues, said in a Grand Junction Sentinel article by Charles Ashby, “these three measures combined are going to cost almost 100,000 jobs.” He added, “Those job aren’t government ones, but private sector positions.”