Guest Columns

WEBBCAST: BEHIND THE NEWS

Media Musings… Or, why is it done that way?

Contributing Columnist

• Let’s recognize that Channel 7 stepped up to cover the weeks of fire storms. Clearly it’s a sign that new owner Scripps-Howard takes local newsgathering seriously, and committed the resources to cover High Park, then Waldo Canyon, with reporters who could actually tell the story. Apparently they also moved crews and producers in from other Scripps-Howard stations to ensure there was enough “people-power” to report the news. What a concept. It did pay off — KMGH was second in the overnight ratings during the height of the Waldo Canyon coverage, close behind 9News.

GOODTIMES: WISH I COULD PROMISE MORE GOODTIMES

I’m proud of what we’ve done in San Miguel County despite hard times

GUEST COLUMNIST

Citizens, it’s election season. The major parties have held their primaries and selected their candidates. As Greens, we had our state convention in Carbondale this past March. I was unanimously nominated there as the San Miguel Greens chapter’s sole county commissioner candidate.

While some counties have term limits, the majority of San Miguel voters have chosen to make their term decisions in the ballot box. And, indeed, we have a tradition of long-serving county elected officials in our county — Sheriff Bill Masters, Clerk Gay Cappis, Assessor Peggy Kantor.

TEEGARDEN: HISTORY OF KANSAS TERRITORY TRULY COMPELLING

Jayhawkers, Border Ruffians, and Bleeding Kansas — quite the adventure

Contributing Columnist

My goal for this column is to interest a few folks who, like me, have previously ignored the compelling adventure that comprises the history of the Kansas Territory.

“Bleeding Kansas” evokes an attention-grabbing mental image, to be sure! So how is it that every time this aspect of our national history has been presented to me, my eyes have glazed over and I’ve drifted off in search of more interesting topics?

HANCOCK: VICTORY IS NOW WITHIN SIGHT

In a country founded on liberty and justice, how could legislature deny civil unions?

GUEST COLUMNIST

I’m very disappointed that the full House was not provided the opportunity to consider the Civil Unions Act as it’s impossible to miss the winds of change sweeping across America and Colorado in recent weeks.

From the White House to our Statehouse, the clarion call to extend basic civil rights to same-sex couples has never been louder.

STYLE MATTERS: HBO’s Veep starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Women politicians and their fashions — the messages they send

Contributing Columnist

Many citizens of this country admit to being embarrassed that the United States, the leader of the free world, has yet to elect a female vice president or president. Veep, an HBO vehicle for Seinfeld alumna Julia Louis-Dreyfus, will do nothing to allay their concerns. Even the name of the show evokes a wince or two. Veep? Sounds like a pet the Flintstones might have owned. JLD plays Vice President Selina Meyers, the same character type she played on Seinfeld and New Adventures of the Old Christine — Elaine, always Elaine.

MASTERS: NO ONE IS ABOVE THE LAW

Law Day stresses courts’ role in democracy

GUEST COLUMNIST

While in a jail cell in Birmingham, Ala., Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote: “Law and order exist for the purpose of establishing justice, and when they fail in this purpose they become the dangerously structured dams that block the flow of social progress.”

THE WEBBCAST

What should we expect from “TBD”?

Contributing Columnist

Governor Hickenlooper has shagged dozens of his “closest friends” to participate in the “TBD Colorado” process, with the lofty goal of creating “public policy recommendations for improving Colorado’s quality of life.”

We’ll miss his old-fashioned grass roots tamale parlor political style

GUEST COLUMNIST

What I will miss most about Paul Sandoval is that you could disagree with him and still be friends. That is very rare today in Denver politics. He took to heart the words of Shakespeare’s second line from Sonnet 116, “Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds.” We could disagree on candidates, issues and ideas, but after the dust of an election settled, we were still friends. After the hurly burly was done, after the battle lost or won, you picked yourself up, dusted yourself off and went on to the next battle as friends.

TEEGARDEN: RECAP OF THE CIVIL WAR

May 1862: A Civil War status report after one year of protracted fighting

Contributing Columnist

In the coming months, I look forward to writing in more detail about 1862, including tragedies (like Antietam and Fredericksburg) and triumphs (like the Emancipation Proclamation) which are part of this year’s Sesquicentennial remembrance, as well as other core antebellum and post-bellum issues.

For this week, however, since so many readers of The Colorado Statesman are about to emerge from the “fog” of the legislative session for 2012, I though it might be helpful to provide a very brief situational report on the American Civil War as it stood 150 years ago this week, in 1862.

STYLE MATTERS: Madeleine Albright: “Read my Pins”

Contributing Columnist

Instead of “Read my Lips,” Madeleine Albright, the first woman secretary of state, prefers “Read my Pins.” Over the years Albright collected hundreds of pins, each with a symbolic message and an anecdote. A selection of her favorites is currently part of an exhibit at the Denver Art Museum called, “Read My Pins, the Madeleine Albright Collection.” The pins arrived in Denver April 15 and will be on display until June 17.