Guest Columns

HUDSON: HOW TIME FLIES!

Denver International Airport — steeped in politics from the start… and into the future

It has been thirty years since Denver’s mayoral campaign served as the political incubator for DIA. Stapleton had been evidencing constraints for at least a decade. Park Hill neighborhoods had recently won their lawsuit against the city, which was draining substantial airport revenues to provide soundproofing against the larger, noisier passenger jets that were beginning to dominate the industry. To the east, Aurora residents were beating a path into court for similar consideration.

WILLIAMS: SENATE LOOKED BACKWARDS WITH BUSINESS AS USUAL

Minority businesses are being shut out, but we’ll never know with such outdated info

GUEST COLUMNIST

Our great state suffered a major setback last week when my colleagues on the Senate Business, Labor and Technology Committee decided to vote against 21st century Colorado in favor of 20th century business as usual.

KING: PREPARING FOR BATTLE WITH NATURE’S MOST POWERFUL FORCES

The Governor needs to fund C-FAC — or risk playing with fire in our tinder box state

GUEST COLUMNIST

One unattended campfire. One lightning strike. Or even darker and more sinister, one intentional terrorist or arsonist’s match strike. That is all it will take for a catastrophic wildfire to erupt in any part of our state’s four million acres of dead trees. A wildfire that will show no mercy and will not yield as it destroys lives, homes and our environment. The fear of fires in Colorado’s most precious water sheds alone should sound alarm bells to the highest reaches of state and federal government.

TEEGARDEN: A LOT AT STAKE IN CIVIL WAR

“Resist manfully,” Johnny Reb! All the Rebels had to do was run out the clock

Contributing Columnist

In reflecting on the greatest Civil War battles prior to Grant’s Overland Campaign of 1864/65, as well as upon public opinion in both the North and the South during that period, it’s truly bewildering that the Union didn’t “throw in the towel.” It takes nothing away from the courage and determination of the southern white people who constituted the Confederacy to say that they had the much less daunting task of the two warring sides.

ARNOLD: BRING YOUR CHECKBOOK

The new Justice Center is a monument to imperial, unaccountable Colorado

GUEST COLUMNIST

Last week’s issue of The Colorado Statesman was host to a pair of guest judiciary commentary articles extolling the virtues of the newly-opened Colorado Justice Center.

Admittedly, it is an impressive edifice — as U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor noted, with an “architectural grandeur” imposing a feeling of being “humbled before the majesty of the law.”

STYLE MATTERS

Penne Baguta and the closing of an institution

Contributing Columnist

While my love of shopping is well known, fewer people know what Mr. Style Matters likes to do. Well, its camping and mountain biking, specifically in Moab, Utah, with good friends and our two sons. The night before each trip, Mr. SM stops at Strings and buys a quadruple portion of his favorite dish — Penne Baguta. He freezes the pasta into a giant block and hides it in the back of his Toyota 4Runner. By the time the sweat-clad, cycled-out group arrives at their first campsite, the penne has melted just enough to be ready for some heating and eating.

BENDER: MONUMENTS TO JUSTICE

Colorado celebrates law day and opening of Ralph L. Carr Judicial Center

GUEST COLUMNIST

Last week, people across the United States observed Law Day. It is a time each year to celebrate the rule of law and the role the courts and legal system play in helping people peacefully resolve disputes in modern society. Here in Colorado, we were privileged and honored to have U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor help us mark the occasion.

FOGG: STRIVING FOR FULL EUALITY BEFORE THE LAW

Law Day marks important strides toward equality

GUEST COLUMNIST

In 1963, my Dad and I heard the words spoken by Martin Luther King Jr. to a large crowd gathered at Cobo Hall in downtown Detroit following the Freedom Walk. It was a great speech. We did not know at that time that many of the words contained in that speech would soon be repeated to inspire not just those at Cobo Hall, but would inspire a nation and generations of Americans to bring to life those words of equality and justice for all carved in the bedrock of our country’s foundation and reiterated in the Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Abraham Lincoln 100 years earlier.

TEEGARDEN: 150 YEARS AGO THIS MONTH…

May 10, 1863 — A turning point of the Civil War

Contributing Columnist

I’m in search of a bright line answer here: Was there an actual date which we can consider the turning point of the Civil War?

Two years ago, in April 2011, America kicked off its so-called Sesquicentennial recollection of the American Civil War, which technically began on April 12, 1861, with the Confederate artillery attack on the Fort Sumter, a federal island fortress in the Charleston, SC harbor. While writing a number of columns for The Colorado Statesman in recognition of this 150th anniversary of that period of U.S. history, I’ve subscribed to the obvious acknowledgement that 1863 was a singularly important year in our history — consider just the following list, which is by no means complete:

RILEY-CHETWYND: WATER MANAGEMENT BEGINS AT LOCAL LEVEL

Denver Botanic Gardens’ commitment to sustainability, water conservation is solid

GUEST COLUMNIST

With outdoor water use accounting for more than half of Denver’s water consumption, water-efficient gardening can help conserve this precious resource. Denver Botanic Gardens identified sustainability as a core value with this in mind — educating our community on how to design and maintain a beautiful garden with plants that are appropriate for a semi-arid climate. From the way we irrigate to the plants we feature in our gardens, we try to set an example of good water management.