Guest Columns

STROGOFF: THE END OF SUMMER, BUT HARDLY THE END OF POLITICS

Recall elections, mental health and Gessler’s announcement for Guv

The Colorado Statesman

When the dust finally settles after Tuesday’s recall elections in Colorado Springs and Pueblo, hopefully the results will be decisive one way or the other — not only for the sake of Democratic senators John Morse and Angie Giron whose political fate is at hand, but also for the numerous other protagonists in this high intrigue political drama that has unfolded over the past few months.

MARES: WE SHOULD NOT BE AFRAID OR ASHAMED

Dispelling myths about mental health is important — but it’s just the beginning

The Colorado Statesman

The terms mental health and mental illness are used often by the press and in other media. For most people those terms conjure a mix of different images and ideas. For some of us, the words are associated with intense feelings and personal experiences. Unfortunately, many people associate incorrect and hurtful ideas with mental health. Journalists, pundits, public officials and ordinary folks just talking about the news have perpetuated myths about what mental health means without even realizing it.

Riley-Chetwynd: DBG extendS beyond plants to art and entertainment

Denver Botanic Gardens is Colorado Proud!

The Colorado Statesman

The more things change, the more they stay the same. Cliché, perhaps… but true. Colorado has seen a lot of change since its establishment as a state, but certain elements remain constant: a pioneering spirit, a connection to the land and a tendency to be at the center of things (and not just geographically, lest we be subjected to any fly-over-state jabs).

NORTON: LET ME BRAG ABOUT MY HOME TOWN

You can stop blaming Greeley for agricultural odors — we’re cleaning up our image

The Colorado Statesman

Many people still think Greeley is a small town with a large cattle population. That is old information and incorrect on both counts. This year Greeley’s population reached 98,000, and not one is of the bovine variety.

NORTON: PIONEERING VISION CONTINUES TODAY

UNC’s roots in the community run deep

The Colorado Statesman

We have always been a part of and not apart from our community.

Absent the pioneering vision of community leaders, the simple fact is our university would not exist.

With the backing of residents who recognized the value of an educated citizenry in a prosperous society, our institution was founded to serve a pressing need in Colorado.

INNIS, DARIN & PROPST: WIND POWER STATS WILL BLOW YOU AWAY

Wind energy works in rural Colorado

The Colorado Statesman

For the first time since May 2008, Colorado’s total jobs numbers are larger than they were before what some have termed “the Great Recession.” 

While this is good news worth mentioning, it’s clear Coloradans are hungry for a lot more good news about jobs and the Colorado economy.

Well there’s good news, Colorado — wind power is up to the task.

SMITH: MICHAEL BENDER THEN AND NOW

‘Justice’ describes Justice Bender to a tee

Congratulations to Chief Justice Mike Bender for his 16 years on the Colorado Supreme Court and his record of extraordinary achievement. He has repeatedly throughout his career stood up for justice and fairness.

HIRSCHFELD: ASCENT TO JAPAN WILL SPUR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

United flight to Tokyo a real asset for state

The Colorado Statesman

On June 10, my husband and I had the distinct honor of being a part of the inaugural United Airlines flight from Denver to Japan. This incredible accomplishment was the result of the hard work of a number of dedicated Colorado community leaders throughout the years. The Denver delegation was part of a ceremony and celebration, led by representatives from the Japanese community, with Mayor Michael Hancock, Governor John Hickenlooper, Kim Day and representatives from United Airlines.

TEEGARDEN: REMEMBRANCES OF JULY 4th

Celebrating both myth and history of Gettysburg as a great Union victory

The Colorado Statesman

July 4, 1863 was “Moving Day” in the American Civil War. While the battle of Gettysburg actually took place over the three-day period of July 1 through 3, culminating with the ill-fated Pickett/Pettigrew Charge against the Union forces on Cemetery Ridge, the longer term impact on the war arguably occurred the next day.

Packing tips for Colorado’s traveling elected officials

The Colorado Statesman

‘Tis the season when politicos find themselves kissing babies, glad-handing voters and washing underwear in motel sinks. As soon as the final gavel descends at the state house, elected officials make plans to go home and tour their districts. Summer visits are key times to keep up with community issues and placate voters. But staying in touch can involve grueling car rides, overloaded itineraries, and lots and lots of packing and unpacking. Colorado weather can be as capricious as an ornery supporter, so even if the trip is just a day, knowing what to bring and what not to, can ease the mood of a worn-out legislator.