Guest Columns

HUDSON: BUT NOT FOR EVERYONE

An exit strategy for Colorado’s entrepreneurs

John Cassidy speculated recently in his New Yorker blog that America’s dysfunctional politics might be entwined with our dysfunctional economics. With one third of Americans struggling to pay their bills and the remainder of the middle class experiencing an inexorable evaporation of their discretionary income, there is much to be unhappy about. By contrast, in an economy that seems to be working well, Momma Merkel was just elected to her third term as Chancellor of all the Germans.

HUDSON: A CONTINUING SAGA

The Denver Post competes for readers directly with the National Enquirer

The banner headline, “Saudi Accused in hit plan,” splashed across page one of Friday’s Denver Post may have caught your attention. Holy cow, was there finally evidence that Homaidan al-Turki, the Colorado inmate recently transferred into the federal prison system for fuzzy reasons, was actually guilty of ordering the assassination of Corrections Chief Tom Clements? No, it wasn’t that. If you were curious enough to work your way to paragraph 14 on page 9, you would discover that al-Turki was accused six years ago by a mentally ill prisoner of threatening to kill him.

MARES: OUR VISION FOR A HEALTHIER COLORADO IS POSSIBLE

60 years of partnering for mental health in Colorado

The Colorado Statesman

In 1953 a diverse group of concerned Coloradans, among them a Denver city attorney, a Greeley professor and a Pueblo psychiatrist, banded together to change their state for the better. These men and women were the parents and siblings of people who were forced into the shadows of society because they had been diagnosed with mental health disorders.

EWEGEN: A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE IN OUR CONSTITUTIONS

Nobody celebrates “The Miracle of Moscow”

The Colorado Statesman

Americans who observed Constitution Day on Sept. 17 may have stopped to contemplate “the Miracle of Philadelphia” — the convention that produced the world’s oldest continuous blueprint for ordered liberty known as the U.S. Constitution.

TOLTZ: PUBLIC SAFETY AND LIVES ARE AT STAKE

Question: Will we let bullies with guns intimidate us into acquiescence or silence?

The Colorado Statesman

What will Coloradans do now? On this appropriately gray, rainy day political leaders and public safety citizen activists are pondering what to do in the wake of last week’s recalls of two Democratic state senators, solely due to their votes to make Colorado safer from gun violence. Will bullies with guns intimidate us into acquiescence or silence? Will Democratic state legislators back away from the gun safety bills they passed just a few months ago? These are the political questions, but public safety and lives are at stake with the answers.

TEEGARDEN: LESSONS FROM OUR FOUNDING FATHERS

Happy Birthday to the U.S. Constitution, birth defects, of course, notwithstanding

The Colorado Statesman

Happy Birthday to the U.S. Constitution. James Madison wrote it, John Marshall interpreted it, Roger Taney and Jefferson Davis tried to destroy it, and Abraham Lincoln not only saved, but also redeemed it.

Brilliant document though it was when adopted by the Constitutional Convention 226 years ago, the U. S. Constitution was originally infected with the deadly virus of slavery. By all logic, neither the document nor the democratic government it established had any chance of surviving to adulthood.

STROGOFF: THE END OF SUMMER, BUT HARDLY THE END OF POLITICS

Recall elections, mental health and Gessler’s announcement for Guv

The Colorado Statesman

When the dust finally settles after Tuesday’s recall elections in Colorado Springs and Pueblo, hopefully the results will be decisive one way or the other — not only for the sake of Democratic senators John Morse and Angie Giron whose political fate is at hand, but also for the numerous other protagonists in this high intrigue political drama that has unfolded over the past few months.

MARES: WE SHOULD NOT BE AFRAID OR ASHAMED

Dispelling myths about mental health is important — but it’s just the beginning

The Colorado Statesman

The terms mental health and mental illness are used often by the press and in other media. For most people those terms conjure a mix of different images and ideas. For some of us, the words are associated with intense feelings and personal experiences. Unfortunately, many people associate incorrect and hurtful ideas with mental health. Journalists, pundits, public officials and ordinary folks just talking about the news have perpetuated myths about what mental health means without even realizing it.

Riley-Chetwynd: DBG extendS beyond plants to art and entertainment

Denver Botanic Gardens is Colorado Proud!

The Colorado Statesman

The more things change, the more they stay the same. Cliché, perhaps… but true. Colorado has seen a lot of change since its establishment as a state, but certain elements remain constant: a pioneering spirit, a connection to the land and a tendency to be at the center of things (and not just geographically, lest we be subjected to any fly-over-state jabs).

NORTON: LET ME BRAG ABOUT MY HOME TOWN

You can stop blaming Greeley for agricultural odors — we’re cleaning up our image

The Colorado Statesman

Many people still think Greeley is a small town with a large cattle population. That is old information and incorrect on both counts. This year Greeley’s population reached 98,000, and not one is of the bovine variety.