Guest Columns

GALLAGHER: WHAT ABOUT HISTORICAL HERITAGE AND WELFARE OF DENVER TAXPAYERS?

Stock Show should not be sold down the river because of Gaylord’s over-arching greed

GUEST COLUMNIST

I will oppose any move of the National Western Stock Show that will damage the City and County of Denver, its citizens and taxpayers, downtown business, our Convention Center and/or the Denver Coliseum. As Auditor I will continue to protect the interests of Denver and its citizens and I will fight any move by the National Western that has a negative impact on them. It will not happen on my watch!

COFFMAN: UNFUNDED FEDERAL MANDATE IS TOO COSTLY

Washington bureaucrats shouldn’t decide who uses bilingual ballots

GUEST COLUMNIST

The right to vote is sacred. When I was the Colorado Secretary of State I worked hard to make sure that every U.S. citizen who called our state home and had the legal right to cast a ballot was afforded the opportunity to do so, but I fail to see how a portion of the 1973 Voting Rights Act contributes to that by forcing an increasing number of local governments to use bilingual ballots all across the United States.

HUDSON: I’M PROUD TO SAY I WAS THERE

Martin Luther King Memorial in D.C. brings back memories from 48 years ago

Contributing Columnist

Forty-eight years ago this week I moved into my dorm room at the University of Maryland in College Park. Freshmen were required to report a week early to undertake an orientation to the state’s flagship campus serving more than 30,000 undergraduates. The program also afforded the opportunity to register early for classes, meet with our academic advisors and purchase textbooks before the real crush occurred. By Wednesday we were getting bored and many of us were itching to go barhopping in Washington, D.C., where the legal drinking age was still 18.

HUDSON: SHOULD THE WEALTHY PAY MORE?

Searching for someone to blame for the economic crisis in the 21st Century

Contributing Columnist

When I went to work for AT&T as a management intern, fresh out of college, the Bell System was a highly unionized monopoly. Lily Tomlin was launching her comedy career as Ernestine, the telephone company operator who would blithely inform callers, “We don’t care, because we don’t have to.” Americans could order their telephones in any color, so long as they were black and manufactured by Western Electric. The Communications Workers of America were a powerful force on the national stage, locked in a symbiotic collaboration with America’s largest employer.

SMITH: BUT INHABITANTS OF JUAREZ FIGHT BACK

Murder and poor mental health in the most dangerous city of the world

Contributing Columnist

Our society is crying out,” El Pastor says.

It’s Thursday, February 23 and we’re in his battered little red car driving south from Juárez, Mexico to what he calls the asilo (asylum) or manicomio (mad house or insane asylum).

HUDSON: REMEMBRANCES OF TIMES PAST

Trinidad was a multi-cultural melting pot long before multi-culti was cool

Contributing Columnist

Last weekend we attended the annual picnic thrown by the Friends of Historical Trinidad and the Trinidad Historical Society at the Mitchell Museum on Main Street. My father-in-law, Tom Allen, has been president of the Friends group for several years. Born in a coal camp west of Trinidad, his father was a muleskinner and proud member of the United Mine Workers. It’s reputed he could pick a horsefly off the rump of a mule with his bullwhip, or snatch a cigarette from your lips if you had the guts to let him do it.

TEEGARDEN: CIVIL WAR GENERALS, PART 3

Civil War Generals Grant, Sherman and the Western Theater of War

Contributing Columnist

The Civil War battle resulting in the Union capture of Fort Donelson, in northern Tennessee, is not nearly as well known as it ought to be, given the eclectic cast of characters serving as general officers who played a role there. But most notably, it was during the preparation for and execution of this campaign that the men who would come to be celebrated as the Union’s two greatest generals began working together.

THE WEBBCAST: AMY STEPHENS DESERVES BETTER

Standing in a circle, and firing at will

Special to The Colorado Statesman

The past month’s spectacle of Congress struggling with a debt ceiling limit, and the compromises over tax increases, cuts in government spending, and the anguished rhetoric, also highlighted a unique feature of partisan politics — the ability of party members to turn upon themselves.

This phenomenon manifests itself with a peculiar exercise in which dueling party members figuratively stand in a circle and fire pistols at each other. Some fall dead, others are wounded, and no one really wins the duel.

LUNDBERG: SO MUCH FOR CUTTING RED TAPE

Colorado’s rule-making bureaucracy needs more than a timeout

GUEST COLUMNIST

When John Hickenlooper was inaugurated as Governor in of Colorado, I was encouraged by the focused attention he gave to controlling the costs and intrusiveness of regulations on the businesses and people of Colorado. Despite our political differences in other areas, I thought we had a common understanding and common interest in reducing the heavy hand of government regulation.

TEEGARDEN: CIVIL WAR GENERALS, PART 2

The Confederate Army & “defensive” strategy

Contributing Columnist

For a variety of reasons, I’ve always had more difficulty gaining insight, perspective and understanding of the main generals of the Confederacy than of their Union counterparts. One contributing factor is certainly the misleading and often false reporting of “history” through the Myth of the Lost Cause. Likewise, I suspect that it’s more difficult to focus on the positive attributes of those who both started and then lost our Civil War.