Guest Columns

DORE: MY TAKE ON THE 2014 STATE OF THE STATE

Judging from experience, there is a lot more non-sense than common sense with Hickenlooper

The Colorado Statesman

On Jan. 9, Governor Hickenlooper addressed a joint session of Colorado’s General Assembly to present the State of the State. As with many speeches, filled with platitudes and praise, it was short on substance. Contrary to my experience during the 2013 legislative session, where rural issues were forgotten and Republican bills were killed, the governor spoke about a new era of bipartisanship and a renewed focus on rural Colorado. I would like to take a moment and discuss my concerns with his speech.

SALAZAR: UNPREDICTABLE CONDITIONS CAN RAISE HAVOC

Mother Nature delivers statewide challenges to Colorado’s agricultural scene

The Colorado Statesman

What’s the weather going to be like today? For most of us the answer may mean putting on a jacket, grabbing an umbrella, or bundling up the kids for the school bus stop. But for a farmer and rancher, the answer can have a significant impact on their very economic well-being.

HUDSON: A CHANGE IN CLIMATE OR A CHANGE IN DIRECTION?

Pumping liquid sunshine from Colorado’s 200 million year-old carbon capture reservoir

Denver’s Davis Graham & Stubbs law firm holds monthly energy policy seminars for those willing to crawl out of bed in the early hours of the morning. Last week’s discussion of “President Obama’s Climate Action Plan” drew a crowd of a hundred or so. The breakfast bar included healthy yogurt berry smoothies with granola and the usual high carb pastries. With this crowd, the donuts disappeared first, amidst grumbling about the lukewarm coffee.

HARVEY: ONLY REAL FIX FOR OBAMACARE IS TO REPEAL IT

Obamacare train wreck hits Colorado, consumer casualties continue to pile up

The Colorado Statesman

On Nov. 6, the Colorado Division of Insurance announced that 249,199 Coloradans have had their health insurance policies cancelled by companies seeking to comply with the federal health reform law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare.

What the public does not yet fully understand is that these cancellations are not a glitch or a hiccup in the design of a web page. Massive policy cancellations were built into the PPACA from the beginning, and we were warned about it early and often.

MARES: COLORADO STILL HAS A LONG WAY TO GO

Updating Colorado’s civil commitment laws is an important, and long overdue, step

The Colorado Statesman

One of the many valuable things about an organization as long-lived and venerable as Mental Health America of Colorado is the historical and often personal context we bring to discussions on a wide range of issues. Our perspective is not just a sterile record of laws and budgets, but the living history of people who have worked together for 60 years to transform our state for the better.

GIBSON: IMPROVEMENTS SHOULD BE MADE

Hancock’s administration is sadly lacking

Contributing Columnist

Editor’s Note: This column has been updated to correct inaccuracies in the first version that ran.

On the morning of Friday, Nov. 8, former Denver City Councilwoman Susan Barnes-Gelt, who writes a monthly opinion column for The Denver Post, braved a chilly, early morning start to address the Downtown Democratic Forum. A major player in city affairs for more than three decades, serving in the Peña administration and as an at-large City Council member from 1995-2003, Barnes-Gelt offered her assessment of Mayor Michael Hancock’s performance at the halfway mark of his first term.

KING: SPECTER OF A CATASTROPHIC WILDFIRE IS REAL

“The Wildfire Games” needs a different ending

The Colorado Statesman

My friends and family who have enjoyed the hit movie “The Hunger Games” have no idea how close that fiction is to reality every wildfire season here in Colorado. In the federal version of the movie, “The Wildfire Games,” our communities are thrust into the same deadly contest every year, and left with the barest resources to save their homes from burning to the ground.

HARBER: VOTERS REJECT MASSIVE TAX HIKE

Lessons from the failure of Amendment 66

The Colorado Statesman

In a stunning electoral defeat, Amendment 66 — representing a much-needed re-writing of the byzantine School Finance Act — went down in flames despite seeming to have everything on its side.

HUDSON: BUT NOT FOR EVERYONE

An exit strategy for Colorado’s entrepreneurs

John Cassidy speculated recently in his New Yorker blog that America’s dysfunctional politics might be entwined with our dysfunctional economics. With one third of Americans struggling to pay their bills and the remainder of the middle class experiencing an inexorable evaporation of their discretionary income, there is much to be unhappy about. By contrast, in an economy that seems to be working well, Momma Merkel was just elected to her third term as Chancellor of all the Germans.

HUDSON: A CONTINUING SAGA

The Denver Post competes for readers directly with the National Enquirer

The banner headline, “Saudi Accused in hit plan,” splashed across page one of Friday’s Denver Post may have caught your attention. Holy cow, was there finally evidence that Homaidan al-Turki, the Colorado inmate recently transferred into the federal prison system for fuzzy reasons, was actually guilty of ordering the assassination of Corrections Chief Tom Clements? No, it wasn’t that. If you were curious enough to work your way to paragraph 14 on page 9, you would discover that al-Turki was accused six years ago by a mentally ill prisoner of threatening to kill him.