Guest Columns

Spring Fashion 2012

GUEST COLUMNIST

I wish I could announce that Spring fashions are radically different from anything we’ve seen on the runway or in stores. Alas, what we are getting is basically more of last year. The good news is we can still wear what we purchased last Spring and enjoy a nice financial savings. For those of us who are yearning for fresh new styles, well we are just going to have to wait until designers get more creative.

WEBBCAST: REMEMBERING MEDILL BARNES

Straight talk about a straight-shooting guy

The Colorado Statesman

Feisty. Principled. Direct.

I’m looking for the right word to begin a remembrance of Medill McCormick Barnes, who died March 1. The practice of starting with one word to define a column topic was an old device used by the late Gene Amole, who wrote for the Rocky Mountain News.

New boutiques in town

GUEST COLUMNIST

The year 2008 was a disaster for locally owned Denver boutiques. About 40 stores, mostly owned by women, bit the dust due to the severe downturn in the economy. But, Style Matters is happy to announce that slowly but surely Denver’s retail scene is perking up. Although we lost Saks Fifth Avenue, we gained H&M. (Of course some would claim this is not at all a fair trade!)

HERN: POPULATION 7 BILLION AND COUNTING

Choose between candidates who understand global ecological realities, and those who don’t

GUEST COLUMNIST

The scariest thing about Halloween last year was not the 6-year old goblins running around Boulder neighborhoods, although some of them were pretty scary. It was the fact that October 31 was designated as the official day when the human population reached 7 billion. For many people, this fact doesn’t mean much. But it has an ominous meaning. The human population continues to grow and grow and grow and grow.

Getting down with down-filled puffy coats

The Colorado Statesman

If there is one winter trend that has swept the country by storm from Manhattan fashionistas to Southern Cal beach bunnies, it is the puffy coat. I don’t mean the older version “Michelin Man” puffy coats. Those coats were so swollen with duck down feathers that wearers waddled instead of walked. And forget about wearing one on a plane. You’d need to buy the coat its own seat. No, what I’m talking about are the new thin, trim, stylish versions that come in a host of vibrant colors: hot pinks, blues, greens and purples along with good old dependable black.

TEEGARDEN: REMEMBRANCES OF LINCOLN ON THE OCCASION OF HIS BIRTHDAY

One more tough choice under pressure for President Abraham Lincoln

GUEST COLUMNIST

February 7, 1862 was the originally scheduled execution date for Nathaniel Gordon, a convicted trans-Atlantic slave trader. However, Gordon, the scion of a respectable Presbyterian family from Portland, Maine, had good reason to believe that neither his death sentence nor any other severe punishment would actually be carried out.

TEEGARDEN: PRESIDENT'S GENERAL WAR ORDER NO. 1

Abraham Lincoln takes charge and orders his generals to fight!

Contributing Columnist

It was 150 years ago, on January 27, 1862, that President Abraham Lincoln issued a somewhat extraordinary directive, titled “President’s General War Order No. 1.” Lincoln’s Order stemmed from both his boiling frustration with the inaction of his top generals and from his own recognition of the strategic opportunity for coordinated and simultaneous action among the Union’s various military forces.

HARLAN: AMERICANS ELECT IS ON THE BALLOT IN COLORADO

Americans Elect are ready to crash the party

GUEST COLUMNIST

What if talk about challenging the status quo was more than talk and the November election saw three presidential contenders running neck and neck? That was the prime question when Americans Elect (AE) held its Regional Delegate Leaders Conference (the first of six) in Omaha. Three dozen people (some committed, some skeptical, all curious) met to plan how to upend the presidential nominating process and take the White House.

CML: 2012 STATE OF OUR CITIES & TOWNS SURVEY

Challenges lie ahead for municipal infrastructure

GUEST COLUMNISTS

You see it every day. Exposed rebar underneath a concrete bridge. Alligator cracking in the street ahead. The water or sewer line break underneath the road that is blocked forcing a detour on your drive home. These are all visible evidence that Colorado cities and towns are struggling to find the dollars needed to maintain the infrastructure that keeps our society functioning.

Stylin’ at Citizen of the West

GUEST COLUMNIST

Lynne Cheney, former Second Lady of the United States, was first in the hearts of National Western Scholarship Trust supporters as she was honored as the 2012 Citizen of the West at a celebratory dinner Jan. 9 on the grounds of Denver’s annual western extravaganza. Her husband Dick Cheney, former vice president, had already been bestowed the honor in 1992. The award is given annually to a person or couple who represents the spirit and values of the West’s heritage. Monies raised at the dinner will fund about 750 scholarships for students studying agriculture at schools in Colorado and Wyoming.