2008 Democratic National Convention

Ice queen, bitch or sentimental pushover: Clinton got it all

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Mike Barnicle on MSNBC said Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-New York, looked, “like everyone's first wife standing outside a probate court.”

Bill Kristol on Fox News said that among the only people supporting Clinton were white women, and “white women are a problem, that’s, you know — we all live with that.”

Neil Cavuto of Fox News suggested Clinton was “trying to run away from this tough, kind of bitchy image.”

Democrats take a new look at Bryan’s populist legacy

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Broadway bon vivant and storyteller extraordinaire Damon Runyon had yet to make tracks for New York in 1908 when the Rocky Mountain News assigned him to profile William Jennings Bryan.

Memo casts doubt about Recreate 68

'How much do you need to know about throwing a brick?'

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

In the months before the U.S. invasion, hundreds of western civilians poured into Iraq in order to risk their lives by acting as human shields between American bombs and Iraqi civilians. Their purpose was to prevent the U.S. from bombing civilian locations in Iraq, and the protesters were greeted like heroes by adoring Iraqi crowds.

Exploring Colorado's host cities:

Inside tips from Colorado Democratic delegates

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Come for the Convention, Stay for Colorado,” reads the welcome sign to Democratic National Convention delegates.

The DNC Web site introduces delegates to Boulder, Colorado Springs, Durango, Estes Park and Vail — host cities in addition to Denver — providing a location map, descriptions of each community and links to their tourism information.

Bryan's support was solid in Denver, few other places

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

When William Jennings Bryan came to Washington D.C., on Jan. 25, 1908, a number of Democratic U.S. senators were waiting to deliver one simple message: Don’t run for president again in 1908.

After all, Bryan had been the Democratic nominee in 1896 and 1900 — and had lost both times.

Former Republicans strengthen state's Dem delegation

By Stephanie Clary
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Brian O’Donnell, a Colorado delegate to the Democratic National Convention regards his past Republican affiliation and voting record as a strength — rather than a hindrance — for his new party.

“I think when you actively think about why you’re a Democrat and choose it, you become more committed and more loyal because you’ve made a conscious choice,” O’Donnell said.

Dems to place Hillary's name in nomination

Move designed to calm Clinton delegates

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Hillary Clinton’s name will be placed in nomination along with Barack Obama’s at the Democratic National Convention, and the traditional state-by-state roll call will proceed as planned on the third day of the convention.

Peek at future DNC venue a hot ticket

By Stephanie Clary
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Free tickets to a Friday, Aug. 22, Pepsi Center open house were snapped up within 24 hours of the announcement that students and 5,000 Colorado residents would get the first glimpse of the arena’s complete transformation into the main venue for the Democratic National Convention.

“We want the people here in the host city to be the first to witness the amazing transformation of the Pepsi Center,” CEO of the DNC committee Leah D. Daughtry said.

Coloradans get half of Invesco seats for DNC

By Stephanie Clary
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

More than half of the seats in Invesco Field at Mile High will be reserved for Colorado residents on Aug. 28, when Sen. Barack Obama accepts the Democratic nomination, Democratic National Convention Committee officials announced Wednesday, Aug. 6.

1908 convention spotlighted suffrage

Colorado modeled women's rights

Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Most schoolchildren learn that Wyoming became the first state to give women the right to vote in all elections. Wyoming was a territory when its male citizens voted for suffrage in 1869, and kept the policy when it entered the union in 1890.