Current News

Tuition equality bill ok’d by committee

Whether it’s a real ASSET remains to be seen
The Colorado Statesman

The Advancing Students for a Stronger Economy Tomorrow (ASSET) bill, the centerpiece of immigration reform facing the legislature this year, passed out of the Democratic-leaning Senate Education Committee 4-3 on a party-line vote Thursday, but the fate of the controversial legislation providing tuition equity for undocumented students remains unclear.

President Obama energizes Colorado crowd with remarks about country’s energy policies

“An all-out, all-of-the-above strategy [to] develop every available source of America’s energy.”
The Colorado Statesman

During a brief stop-over at Buckley Air Force base in Aurora on Thursday, President Barack Obama said that after hearing talk about reducing America’s dependence on foreign oil his entire life, his administration is finally doing something about it. Pointing to initiatives under way at Buckley, Obama said he plans to harness the vast purchasing power of the military to invigorate markets for clean energy, a move he predicted would save taxpayers money while strengthening national security.

Early GOP caucuses could alter national political landscape

The Colorado Statesman

Just a couple weeks ago, it looked like the Colorado Republican Party’s decision to move its precinct caucuses up to the first week in February wouldn’t matter much. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, by all appearances, was prepared to bag the first three presidential nominating contests — in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina — leaving it to subsequent states merely to nod their approval and endorse the presumptive nominee.

Tried and true tips on how to navigate the caucus process

The Colorado Statesman

Douglas County Republican Crista Huff isn’t the only one teaching voters how to navigate the caucus process — Republican presidential campaigns are training supporters in hopes of netting delegates via subsequent assemblies, and some of Huff’s past pupils are organizing classes of their own this year — but she’s been running classes for more than two years and sounds like she has the art down to a science.

Sen. Udall strives for civility during State of the Union

CD 5 Rep. Doug Lamborn doesn’t attend, but the Republican still has a lot to say
The Colorado Statesman

Despite one Colorado representative’s very public decision to not attend the State of the Union address earlier in the week, the remainder of the state’s delegation sat together on the House floor in a display of unity.

InnerView with Bill Cadman

The Colorado Statesman

Senate Minority Leader Bill Cadman says the value of relationships among lawmakers can’t be overstated and predicted that this year’s session will produce results because of strong relationships across the aisle and between the chambers. Jobs and the economy are the key subjects this year, and Cadman says he’s confident both Democrats and Republicans will come together to ease regulatory burdens hampering job creation in the state.

Pro-gun bills ignite charges of partisan pandering

The Colorado Statesman

Republicans have introduced a flurry of early pro-gun bills in both chambers of the Colorado legislature, leaving gun control advocates speculating that the influx of legislation during a crucial election year serves to pander to conservative voters.

On the road with Mark Udall

Special to The Colorado Statesman

“Does Jim Rizzuto still smoke his pipe?” U.S. Senator Mark Udall asks. It’s Friday, the 13th of January, we’re in La Junta and, yes, Jim Rizzuto, former Joint Budget Committee member and now the president of Otero Junior College, still smokes his pipe.

Resolution repealing health care causes ill feelings

The Colorado Statesman

Republican and Democratic legislators took political punches at each other Thursday during the first house floor debate of the session over a resolution asking Congress to repeal federal health care reform.

A new era begins for New Era Colorado

The Colorado Statesman

More than 200 young politicos — and their supporters — showed up at a Capitol Hill bar on Jan. 11 at New Era Colorado’s annual celebration of the Legislature’s opening day. Lawmakers, campaign operatives and candidates rubbed shoulders with young activists and raised toasts to an ambitious legislative agenda unveiled earlier that day down the street at the Capitol.