Current News

Gov. Ritter defends cuts, energy policy

By Ellen Miller
WEST SLOPE CORRESPONDENT

GRAND JUNCTION — Gov. Bill Ritter had to run a gauntlet of protesters — about 20 of whom were angrily vocal — before he could get inside Two Rivers Convention Center to defend his budget cuts at the Sept. 12 fall meeting of Club 20.

Gaming towns set to feel budget ax, too

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

COLORADO SPRINGS — Maybe Las Vegas can assure that “What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.” But Colorado’s gaming communities are enraged by Gov. Bill Ritter’s proposal to cut grants to their safety and health programs — and they’re not about to keep quiet about it.

Joe Blake takes over as CSU’s first systemwide chancellor

By Jason Kosena
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

FORT COLLINS — A new page has turned.

As he stood in front of the Colorado State University marching band under sunny blue skies, Joe Blake, the former president and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, officially took the helm of the state’s second largest university on Thursday.

Idled workers protest budget cuts

By Jason Kosena
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

State workers and advocates for the disabled felt the pain of the state’s budget woes on Tuesday, the first of four unpaid furlough days for state employees mandated by Gov. Bill Ritter in an effort to address the state’s budget shortfall.

They didn’t suffer in silence.

Norton, Romanoff to announce for Senate

By Jody Hope Strogoff
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Like a quickly changing game of musical chairs, candidates in Colorado’s U.S. Senate race are scrambling for position in a race that is changing almost daily.

Coffman shares CD 6 health care pain

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

KIOWA — Elbert Road unfurled like a black ribbon over hills offering views of weather-beaten barns, pristinely painted homes and lush green pastures where beautiful quarter horses and cattle browsed lazily. A car zoomed by on this lonely stretch in rural Colorado — adding a contrast to the impression that most folks were gathered around their kitchen tables as the sun set.

Robert Kennedy Jr. awes Denver crowd

By Jason Kosena
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Like his father before him, Robert Kennedy Jr. can really wow a crowd.

As the eldest son of the late Sen. Robert Kennedy spoke about the role renewable energy can play in changing the nation, about 500 people gathered at the downtown Grand Hyatt for the Ninth Annual Fall Luncheon of the Colorado Conservation Voters listened intently, nodded in agreement and focused an almost star-struck level of attention on his words.

Springs-USOC deal stalled at starting gate

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

COLORADO SPRINGS — After two years of wrangling, Colorado Springs officials gloated when the city finally landed a new agreement to keep the United States Olympic Committee headquarters here for 30 years. But less than a month later, the deal is being derailed by a lawsuit that challenges its legality.

The new agreement, like the city’s original deal to secure the USOC, is being stymied by a problem with its funding mechanism — the sale of Certificates of Participation.

Politics takes center stage in Pueblo

Gossip about GOP Senate, governor candidates is thicker than smoke at two Pueblo barbecues

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

PUEBLO — Two annual barbecues kicked off the 2009 Colorado State Fair, and both served up fabulous steaks and sizzling political gossip to satisfy the appetites of Democrats and Republicans alike.

Worker comp provider defends practices

By Jason Kosena
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

And the beat goes on.

The Interim Committee to Study Issues Related to Pinnacol Assurance — known as the “Pinnacol Hearings” to some in the Legislature — held its third daylong session Monday at the Capitol.