Peter Marcus

Termed-out Democrats discuss their legacies

The Colorado Statesman

Several Democrats will face term limits this year after many years of service, including Rep. Mark Ferrandino, the first openly gay speaker of the House, who believes that his rise to leadership oddly rested in part on the failure of a same-sex civil unions measure in 2012.

Sworn-in on Oct. 1, 2007 after then-Rep. Mike Cerbo of Denver stepped down, Ferrandino was only 29 years old. The bright-eyed optimist with a penchant for budget discussions could have never dreamed that his legislative journey would take him to the top of the House chamber’s food chain.

Outgoing GOP lawmakers share memories

The Colorado Statesman

Several Republican lawmakers will face term limits this year, exiting the legislature after many years of service, including a former House speaker and a former majority leader who both stood at the helm through one of the most tumultuous times in the legislature’s history.

Reps. Frank McNulty of Highlands Ranch and Amy Stephens of Monument came in together, built a majority together, lost control of the power structure together, and will now leave the institution together.

House GOP coup against Rep. Priola fails

Frustration with caucus whip exposes rift as GOP talks unity 
The Colorado

Just two days before Republicans head into the State Assembly with a message of unity, conservative House Republicans on Thursday attempted a coup against Minority Caucus Whip Kevin Priola in an effort to oust him from leadership.

The effort — led by Rep. Chris Holbert, R-Parker — failed due to confusion over caucus rules. But an initial vote by the caucus during the 30-minute meeting indicated that a majority of House Republicans were willing to oust Priola as whip.

Neguse hopes to bridge political divide in the Secretary of State’s office

The Colorado Statesman

One thing Democrat Joe Neguse will not be doing if he is elected secretary of state in November is moonlighting.

The University of Colorado Regent from CD 2 points to the kerfuffle current Secretary of State Scott Gessler, a Republican, caused shortly after taking office in 2011 when Gessler planned to work part-time at his old law firm, which deals almost exclusively with election law.

Democratic candidate for AG is a quick study

The Colorado Statesman

The sole Democratic candidate for attorney general says that he would look at each case through a legal lens rather than through a political filter if he were elected the state’s next chief attorney.

Don Quick, the former district attorney for Adams County, is almost sure to receive his party’s nomination at the State Assembly in order to compete against one of two Republican candidates, either Rep. Mark Waller of Colorado Springs, or Chief Deputy Attorney General Cynthia Coffman.

Markey pledges more visibility than current treasurer

The Colorado Statesman

Former U.S. Rep. Betsy Markey is ready for another go at public office after only a short two years in Washington, D.C. But she says she isn’t using the treasurer’s race as an opportunity to jump back into the limelight.

“I’ve had a long career in both the public and the private sectors, and I’m at a point in my career where I want to do something that is meaningful for me for the next couple of years,” explained Markey.

Williams hopes to succeed fellow Republican Gessler for Secretary of State

The Colorado Statesman

Republican candidate for secretary of state Wayne Williams says the current office, led by Republican Scott Gessler, could be doing a better job working with county clerks.

Williams might be walking into a tense situation next year if he defeats Democrat Joe Neguse this November. Both Williams and Neguse are running unopposed for their respective parties’ nominations. Gessler is seeking the GOP’s nomination for governor instead of running for re-election.

Republicans Waller and Coffman both look to balance politics with serving the state

The Colorado Statesman

The two Republican candidates for attorney general both agree that there needs to be a balance between political activism and law when it comes to the top legal office.

Rep. Mark Waller of Colorado Springs and Chief Deputy Attorney General Cynthia Coffman both say that their first priority would be representing the state as its chief attorney if they were elected to the office. But they also believe that there is no hiding from the fact that there are politics at play in any statewide elected office.

Stapleton is focused on treasurer’s job — for now

The Colorado Statesman

Republican Walker Stapleton acknowledges that many in the political world believe he is positioning himself for a political future beyond that of the treasurer’s office. But the outspoken state treasurer says his only true intent currently is to seek re-election for another four years managing the state’s finances.

“I’m focused on doing my job right now, and I enjoy dealing with economic fiscal issues, and if I didn’t enjoy my job, I wouldn’t be running for re-election,” explained Stapleton.

Senate okays budget bill; now for the conference committee

The Colorado Statesman

The Senate on Friday approved its version of the budget for the upcoming fiscal year with much fewer fireworks and less drama than when the House debated the budget the week before.

The so-called “Long Bill” for Fiscal Year 2014-15 passed the Senate by a bipartisan vote of 26-8, with several Republicans opposing the spending measure because they believe more can be done to fund education especially.