Miller Hudson

HUDSON: $19 MILLION IN ANNUAL SERVICES AT STAKE

A crisis of major magnitude as mental health services are delayed over legal wrangling

The Colardo Statesman

Gravel-voiced Illinois Republican Everett Dirksen, the long-serving U.S. Senate Minority Leader, observed a half century ago that, “…a billion here and a billion there and pretty soon you’re talking about real money.” God only knows what he would have to say about today’s trillion dollar federal budgets. In Colorado, by contrast, it appears $100 million is enough money to fill a courtroom with a dozen $400-an-hour attorneys.

HUDSON: WE’RE TALKING ABOUT U.S. 36 AGAIN

Colorado’s taste of Arab Spring organizing remains more than a little bit troubling

The Colorado Statesman

There was considerable smug self-congratulation reported by the commentariat during the Arab Spring uprisings across the Middle East as organizers relying on social media and the Internet turned out first thousands and then tens of thousands of protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and elsewhere across Tunisia, Libya and Syria. Geeks and politicos found it just the most wonderful thing imaginable that democratic aspirations were flowering with an assist from broadband technology. Really, how very, very clever of us!

HUDSON: HICKENLOOPER NEEDN’T WORRY ABOUT THESE FOUR

The Republican junior varsity candidates for governor appear to be revolving

The Colorado Statesman

The Denver Post conducted the second Republican gubernatorial debate of the 2014 campaign this week. Absent were alpha dogs Tom Tancredo and Secretary of State Scott Gessler. Two new candidates have joined the field since last year, businessman Jason Clark, and Steve House, Adams County Republican chair. At the December debate at a local television station, not a single candidate was willing to fully embrace the theory of evolution through natural selection. Nonetheless, these B team candidates proved that their positions have been evolving during the interim.

HUDSON: TOPIC IS EXACTING A TOLL ON EVERYONE

What (or who) is driving all the panic about alleged privatization of U.S. 36 in Boulder?

Contributing Columnist

The Drive SunShine Institute convened an emergency public meeting on the afternoon of Jan. 31 at the Alfalfa’s community room in Boulder. The alleged public emergency was an imminent privatization of U.S. 36 by the Colorado Department of Transportation’s High Performance Transportation Enterprise, which is about to conclude a widely publicized two year solicitation process for a Public Private Partnership to extend RTD’s busway and high occupancy toll lanes from Interlocken on into Boulder. This contract will also lease existing HOV lanes on I-25 from downtown Denver that connect to U.S. 36.

HUDSON: THOSE AT THE FRINGES OF OUR SOCIETY BEWARE

For discussion this week: Venial sins, petty offenses and the art of the blind eye

The Colorado Statesman

Both the clergy and the courts acknowledge there are transgressions so minor that no number of them will extend our sojourn in purgatory or add to earned prison time. For these misdemeanors there are no “three strike” rules. Little white lies and photo radar tickets are all of a kind — sufficient to outrage the Puritan moralists in our midst, but unlikely to inflict lasting harm beyond that brief flash of shamed conscience. But, what of offenses we witness and choose to ignore? More to the point, what is our responsibility in a democracy when the villain is government itself?

HUDSON: CAREER AMBASSADOR PICKERING A NATIONAL TREASURE

Our options: choose to negotiate a nuclear deal now, or fight an Iranian war later

The Colorado Statesman

World Denver is a non-profit membership organization dedicated to connecting Denver with the world by fostering timely discussions of world affairs. Last Monday night, together with the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Denver, World Denver co-hosted a talk by Ambassador Thomas Pickering and Dr. Jim Walsh of Massachusetts Institute of Technology Securities Studies Program at the Brown Palace fresh from their Denver Post commentary (1/12/14) “A Delicate Dance with Iran.” Their op-ed strongly admonished the U. S.

HUDSON: A REAL MOVER FOR TRANSPORTATION IN THE STATE

The Jack McCroskey(s) I like to remember

The Colorado Statesman

Do I contradict myself?
Very well then I contradict myself;
I am large — I contain multitudes.

Walt Whitman

Legalization of pot heats up stone cold day in Denver

It’s a brave new world out there
The Colorado Statesman

In the gloom before sunrise on January 1, TV trucks were lined up like dominos along Brighton Blvd. just south of I-70 as more than a hundred journalists of every stripe (think Al Jazeera) sipped coffee and munched sticky, warm donuts purchased from an opportunistic food truck situated in the parking lot at Denver’s Discreet Dispensary (DDD). Occasional snowflakes swirled briskly in the air as nearly 200 customers awaited the first retail marijuana sales in Colorado.

HUDSON: HE EARNED YOUR RESPECT, IF NOT YOUR AFFECTION

Ken Gordon’s pleas on behalf of the better angels of our nature will be sorely missed

The Colorado Statesman

Thirty years ago, after I departed the Legislature, I allowed myself to be recruited as a candidate for Democratic Party Chair of Denver County. This didn’t have so much to do with my intimate involvement in party politics, but because two young candidates and personal friends, Wellington Webb and Federico Peña, were running for Mayor. The party machinery had been in the grip of Tooley or McNichols supporters for nearly two decades and both insurgent candidates were interested in a dispassionate and neutral hand at the helm of Democratic Party affairs.

Export-Import loan guarantees could help state

...if Colorado would utilize them
The Colorado Statesman

John McAdams, former Vice President and CEO of the U. S. Export-Import Bank, visited Denver this week as a guest of state Rep.Tracy Kraft-Tharp, D-Arvada. Part marketing junket and part tutorial, McAdams explained how the EX-IM bank could assist Colorado businesses and manufacturers in marketing their goods and services to an expanding global market. Some of his numbers were astonishing. The U. S. economy represents only 5 percent of the global market today.