Miller Hudson

HUDSON: LET’S HEAR IT FOR THE OLD TIMERS

Hickenlooper lauds bipartisanship session at state of the state to business community

Contributing Columnist

If you’ve been watching the current reprise of Fargo on FX from the inimitable Coen brothers, you have witnessed several victims tossed into car trunks who later crawled out to find their captors either unconscious, dead or vanished. Governor John Hickenlooper emerged the day after the 2014 legislative session adjourned last week to deliver State of the State remarks before the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce in a similar daze of slightly mystified elation.

HUDSON: LABORING OVER STATISTICS OF STATE EMPLOYEES

More than half of the state’s workforce is now caught up in compression

Contributing Columnist

Unless you happen to find yourself caught in the squeeze, salary compression is one of those phrases that bewilders far more than it enlightens. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? Is it more or less a natural result over time, or a flaw introduced by shortsighted decisions and a disregard for legal obligations? During bouts of economic distress is it simply a burden that should be borne without complaint, or does it insinuate injustices that inexorably undermine the integrity of any organization? (Weighty considerations, to be sure.)

HUDSON: SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

CU’s annual Conference on World Affairs brings international flair to Boulder campus

Contributing Columnist

Each spring, shortly before final exams, the Conference on World Affairs schedules a week-long program of forums, panels, speakers and cultural performances across the University of Colorado campus in Boulder. This year’s edition was the 66th outing for the CWA. Originally designed as a town meets gown opportunity for the larger community, the Conference was also created to provide a little international flair to what was then surely an obscure and backwater center of higher learning in flyover country.

HUDSON: NO POLITICS HERE, RIGHT?

Hickenlooper glides by Colorado’s allegedly Independent Ethics Commission

Contributing Columnist

Before publicly debating its ruling on whether Gov. John Hickenlooper violated ethical standards last year by hosting the Democratic Governors’ Association meeting in Aspen, Colorado’s Independent Ethics Commission went into executive session Monday morning to confer with their attorney. Apparently in the Passover spirit they must have slit the throat of a lamb, drained its blood and examined the entrails for legal guidance, perhaps augmented with an assist from a snorted elixir of powdered lizard gizzard, eye of newt and skin of Bufo alvarius.

HUDSON: SHOULD THE SECRETARY OF STATE BE PUNISHED?

Democrats: Is this really a matter of ethics?

Contributing Columnist

Was your civic conscience troubled when you learned that Colorado’s Republican Secretary of State, Scott Gessler, attended an election law conference in order to compare notes with other Republican election lawyers in 2012? Was it particularly irksome to discover this meeting was piggybacked on the Republican National Convention scheduled in nearby Tampa, Florida? Were you further outraged to find out that Gessler dipped into his discretionary expense account in order to cover his travel expenses for appearing as a speaker at this partisan confab?

HUDSON: SHOULD THE GOVERNOR OF THE STATE BE PUNISHED?

Republicans: Is this really a matter of ethics?

Contributing Columnist

Did it prick your civic conscience when you learned that Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper hosted a meeting of the Democratic Governors Association in Aspen? Was it particularly galling to find out this meeting was primarily a subterfuge to assemble Democratic governors for a high-dollar fundraiser with the Aspen glitterati? And, did it further chafe that raw spot beneath your saddle when you discovered the Governor and several of his staff received free meals, free rooms and free stuff?

Former Sec. of Defense weighs in on Bush, Obama

The Colorado Statesman

World Denver lassoed another top tier speaker for its Denver luncheon this week, serving up former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates along with the usual rubber chicken. Since leaving the Obama administration, Gates has assumed a position as Chancellor at William & Mary College and written a memoir covering his five years (2006-11) as Defense Secretary for Presidents George Bush and Barack Obama. He enjoys the distinction of being the only Defense Secretary to have survived a change in administrations.

HUDSON: COLORADO’S FIRST COMMITTEE OF CORRESPONDENCE

Reining in the federal government through a Constitutional Convention of the States

Contributing Columnist

“On the application of the Legislatures of
two-thirds of the several states, (Congress) shall call
a convention for proposing amendments.” Article V

It’s somewhat debatable whether the “Fracking Debate” was actually a debate

The Colorado Statesman

Last week the Independence Institute and the Environmental Alliance teamed to organize a “Just the Fracking Facts” debate at the Denver Post Auditorium. Despite considerable promotion of the event it only attracted 50 or 60 observers, most of whom were solidly allied with one side or the other in this slow, simmering dispute. Colorado voters, however, appear destined to hear a lot more about this conflict between now and election day.

HUDSON: FLIPPING THE LID ON PANDORA’S BOX

Judge grants Preliminary Injunction in case involving mental health services

The Colardo Statesman

Denver District Court Judge Hub Stern granted the Preliminary Injunction requested by Crisis Access on Friday, Feb. 28. His injunction prevents the Colorado Department of Human Services from proceeding with the re-bidding of its original solicitation for a vendor that would provide statewide emergency services to individuals experiencing an acute behavioral health crisis.