Marianne Goodland

Regis Groff memorialized at state Capitol

The Colorado Statesman

“This is an example of a life well-led….”

The Colorado State Senate on Wednesday memorialized the life and service of one of the titans of the state Senate in the 20th century, former Sen. Regis Groff, who passed away in October at the age of 79.

Groff served 20 years in the Senate, from 1975 to 1994, including four years as minority leader.
Wednesday’s memorial saw a long line of current and former legislators eager to share their memories of Groff and the impact he had on Colorado.

House kicks immigrant driver’s license fight back to Senate

The Colorado Statesman

The Democratic-led House on Wednesday sent a supplemental bill back to the Republican-led Senate that will start another round of dueling press releases around ideological differences over driver’s licenses for undocumented immigrants.

Construction defects heads to Lone Tree

The Colorado Statesman

As local governments wait for the General Assembly to begin its work on Senate Bill 15-177, the construction defects bill, others continue to make decisions about their own ordinances, in hopes of attracting more affordable multi-family construction.

Tuesday night, the Lone Tree City Council, located in the south metro area, unanimously passed an ordinance partly based on one passed late last year by the Lakewood City Council. The vote came after about two hours of testimony from representatives of the Community Associations Institute and several Lone Tree realtors.

National Org Sues Colorado over Marijuana Industry

The Colorado Statesman

Two lawsuits filed in federal court Thursday seek to force Colorado to end the legalization of marijuana.

The Safe Streets Alliance, along with a Frisco hotel and two Lakewood residents are suing the state, the local jurisdictions that zoned marijuana operations, and several marijuana distributors.

Republicans leverage JBC, Senate stances for policy maneuvering

The Colorado Statesman

Senate Republicans flexed their muscles this week in a big way, shooting down a supplemental bill for the Department of Public Safety that seeks to provide more funding for background checks.

Legislative rural caucus kicks off 2015 with first meeting

The Colorado Statesman

The General Assembly’s rural caucus began its 2015 activities Wednesday, hosting a meeting with the Colorado Ag Council to find out how they can help the ag community in the coming months.

Concurrent committee hearings kept some rural members from taking part in the Feb. 18 lunch meeting, although a dozen legislators were able to attend, some for the entire meeting and some for just a few minutes. One-third of the legislators are new members this year.

Construction bill would curb lawsuits

The Colorado Statesman

What is expected to be the landmark bill of the 2015 legislative session was introduced Tuesday. Senate Bill 15-177 would amend Colorado’s construction defects law, first passed in 2001. Supporters, including four bipartisan lawmakers, say the bill will help address a dearth of affordable middle-class housing in Colorado, primarily in the condo market.

SB 177 is the third attempt in as many years to address what supporters claim is an inability of developers to build affordable condos because of fear of class-action lawsuits.

Credit card transaction bill aims to reduce fees for small businesses

The Colorado Statesman

A bill to reduce the burden on small businesses that handle credit card transactions is pitting businesses against credit card companies, banks and the Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce.

House Bill 15-1154 is sponsored by Rep. Jon Becker, R-Fort Morgan, and Rep. Alec Garnett, D-Denver.

Current law requires businesses to send sales tax to the states. When those businesses accept credit cards, they are charged a percentage, usually 2 to 3 percent, as a fee by the credit card companies and banks. That fee is charged not only on the purchase but on the sales tax as well.

Senate childcare bill faces uphill struggle

The Colorado Statesman

An effort to deregulate licensing requirements for childcare providers who serve up to nine children has run into trouble in its first committee in the Senate.

Thursday, the Senate Health and Human Services Committee reviewed Senate Bill 15-070, sponsored by its chair, Sen. Kevin Lundberg, R-Berthoud.

The bill would remove licensing, registration and other regulatory requirements for childcare providers who serve fewer than 10 children. Current state law caps the number of children cared for by an unlicensed provider at four or fewer.

New pols look at gun laws from other side

The Colorado Statesman

This week, the General Assembly began the process of dealing, once again, with legislation that seeks to repeal some of the controversial 2013 gun control laws.

Six legislators in the 2015 session can tie their 2014 elections either directly or indirectly to the 2013 gun debates. All of them own guns, some with lifelong histories with firearms, and three were part of Monday’s hearings in the House and Senate.