Jody Hope Strogoff and Ernest Luning

The Party Chairs: Republican Ryan Call and Democrat Rick Palacio

The Colorado Statesman

In the thick of a busy nomination calendar for Colorado candidates, state Republican Party Chairman Ryan Call and state Democratic Party Chairman Rick Palacio joined The Colorado Statesman for a wide-ranging discussion about the upcoming election and the possible fortunes of candidates in a state both agree is up for grabs in the November election.

Tom Cronin and Bob Loevy on the color purple

The Colorado Statesman

Colorado College political science professors Thomas Cronin and Robert Loevy are so confident that Colorado is a solidly “purple” state — decidedly up for grabs despite big wins by Democrats this year and by Republicans in the last election — that they went to the mat when it came time to design their most recent book’s cover.

GOP, Dem chairs analyze elections

The Colorado Statesman

Three weeks after President Barack Obama won Colorado and Democrats took back control of the state House by a wide margin, state Democratic Party Chairman Rick Palacio and state Republican Party Chairman Ryan Call joined The Colorado Statesman for a wide-ranging discussion about the election and the future of both parties in a state both say they expect to remain up for grabs.

InnerView: State Chairs Ryan Call and Rick Palacio

The Colorado Statesman

State Democratic Party chairman Rick Palacio and his Republican counterpart Ryan Call have a lot in common. Both are Colorado natives with lengthy political resumés, and both worked their way up through the party structure with relative speed. Palacio, who emerged from a crowded contest to helm the Democrats last year at age 36, was the youngest state party chair in memory. He lost that distinction a few weeks later when Call, who is a few months younger, managed the same feat on the Republican side.

InnerView: Amy Stephens

The Colorado Statesman

Stephens, Looper engaged in brutal battle

A Statesman InnerView with the GOP candidates in Colorado Springs’ contentious HD 19 primary

InnerView: Marsha Looper

The Colorado Statesman

Colorado Statesman (CS:) How are things going?

Marsha Looper (ML): I believe, in spite of all of the challenges that we’ve had to deal with this year, I think the session’s going well. We’re passionate about our issues and that’s why we’re all here, is to represent the issues that are important to our district. And so, I’m sure that the rest of the session will be just as exciting, and I look forward to it. Yeah.

InnerView with Bill Cadman

The Colorado Statesman

Senate Minority Leader Bill Cadman says the value of relationships among lawmakers can’t be overstated and predicted that this year’s session will produce results because of strong relationships across the aisle and between the chambers. Jobs and the economy are the key subjects this year, and Cadman says he’s confident both Democrats and Republicans will come together to ease regulatory burdens hampering job creation in the state.

InnerView with Brandon Shaffer

The Colorado Statesman

Senate President Brandon Shaffer says he doesn’t expect ideological differences — or his own congressional campaign — to get in the way of the Legislature’s ability to have a productive session this year. Amid calls for bipartisanship and agreement that jobs and the economy are the Legislature’s top priorities this session, Shaffer says the session has a “good tone and a good collaborative feel going,” and that he’s already working with Senate Republicans to advance legislation.

InnerView with Frank McNulty

The Colorado Statesman

House Speaker Frank McNulty says GOP lawmakers are excited about the 2012 legislative session and expect a constructive 120 days despite friction with Democrats over a reapportionment process that ended up pitting several Republicans against each other.

InnerView with Mark Ferrandino

The Colorado Statesman

As the Colorado General Assembly prepares to gavel into session this week, the leader of the House Democrats predicts that lawmakers will be able to tackle a range of thorny problems facing the state, despite any lingering anger among Republicans — who hold a one-vote majority in the chamber — over a Democratic-driven legislative reapportionment decision GOP leaders have called “vindictive.” In part because so many legislators won’t be returning next year, says House Minority Leader Mark Ferrandino, D-Denver, the bitter partisan atmosphere could still yield a productive session as lawmakers consider their legacies.