Ernest Luning

News From Yesteryear

Owens debates Ref C, Tancredo shoots 'em up, Dems look ahead, Jabs weighs run

The Colorado Statesman

Ten Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … Gov. Bill Owens and former House Majority Leader Dick Armey agreed that Texas was a great state but, beyond that, clashed over the wisdom of Referendum C, finding little common ground. Armey, the Republican head of FreedomWorks, was in town to spark a looming battle over ideology among conservatives over the best way to fix the ailing economy — more budget cuts were on deck in Colorado — by drawing the line on any tax increases.

News from Yesteryear

Gore wows donors and delegates, Jabs blasts JOA, Shavano Institute gets new name

The Colorado Statesman

Fifteen Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … Vice President Al Gore took the state “by storm” in a two-day presidential campaign visit that kicked off with a $200,000 fundraiser at a Cherry Hills Village home. Denver Mayor Wellington Webb introduced the veep and sang the praises of the Gore-Clinton administration, as some wags were calling it, owing to the nearly daily upward revision of Gore’s importance and influence.

‘Coup attempt’ rocks state GOP, House stands firm

Chair battles former supporters demanding he resign post, foes vow to press on
The Colorado Statesman

The Colorado Republican Party was thrown into turmoil this week after three powerful Republicans attempted to persuade state GOP chair Steve House to resign.

While House initially took them up on the offer, he quickly rescinded his resignation — reneged on the deal, detractors say — and fired back at Attorney General Cynthia Coffman, former U.S. Rep. Tom Tancredo and Pueblo County Republican chair Becky Mizel, the three most prominent supporters of House’s bid to run the party earlier this year.

News from Yesteryear

Buchanan denounces 'smear campaign' in assembly loss, weighs petition drive to take on Hart; State reels from 1965 flood

The Colorado Statesman

Thirty-five Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … Democratic U.S. Sen. Gary Hart, who was facing an avid crop of potential Republican challengers in his 1980 bid for a second term, sat down for an in-depth interview with Statesman editors Walt Kinderman and Miles Porter IV. Hart said that “regional representation” had become a key theme of his first term, particularly related to energy and natural resource issues while Colorado was emerging on the national and international stages. “This state, for the better part of 100 years, has been primarily an insular, somewhat parochial, introverted place where people enjoyed living, raised agricultural products and families, enjoyed themselves, worked hard, but were not all that involved in national and international issues,” Hart said.

News from Yesteryear

Eastern Plains farmers, ranchers grapple with drought, falling egg prices, massive downpour

The Colorado Statesman

Fifty Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … U.S. Rep. Frank Evans, a Democrat, labeled some of the engineering and building under way at the Air Force Academy “a debacle,” charging that the architects didn’t have “the vaguest idea of the dramatic changes which take place in temperature in this area.” …

Hancock: Denver’s chief marketer

The Colorado Statesman

Making his way from a crowded Tech Center hotel ballroom, where he had just declared Denver “the most economically vibrant city in the United States today,” Mayor Michael Hancock stopped to talk with a half dozen friends and admirers, some buttonholing him for a few moments as he sped through the hallways — he’s known for staying on schedule, his days divided into strict 15-minute increments — and others pressing items in his hands. “Michael!” they cried as he rounded a corner, broad grins and high fives in abundance.

RMGO heckles Owens on guns, DeGette dodges primary opponent

The Colorado Statesman

Fifteen Years Ago this week in The Colorado Statesman … Republicans should have had a routine state assembly and convention — there were no major statewide races splitting delegates, George W. Bush had sewn up the presidential nomination, and the GOP was safely in control of the congressional delegation and Legislature — but tensions were high, and Gov. Bill Owens was the target of much contention over guns, an issue that split delegates fiercely.

Denver elects four to council in run-offs

The Colorado Statesman

Denver voters elected four newcomers to City Council in a run-off election on Tuesday, bringing to seven the number of rookies who will take office on the 13-member body next month. It’s the most turnover since 2003, when term limits kicked in and shook up the city council.

Remembering the Fallen

The Colorado Statesman

Wearing a red shirt declaring that she is among the “Proud Colorado Marine Moms,” Julie Taylor sat near the back of the POF Hall on Saturday in Denver among hundreds of friends, family members and fellow veterans and service members who gathered to remember the fallen for Memorial Day.

Hick, Gardner talk energy future

The Colorado Statesman

Gov. John Hickenlooper told a crowd of energy industry and civic leaders on Wednesday that he doesn’t expect restrictions on hydraulic fracturing and drilling to reach the ballot next year. The former geologist contended that enthusiasm for anti-fracking measures has ebbed since a year ago, when ballot measures were at the center of hotly contested political fights.

“There will be proposals,” he said, “but I don’t think there’ll be something funded to a significant extent. I don’t expect there to be something that’ll get on the ballot.”