2008 Political Campaigns

Palin casts spell over House races

DEMS READJUST THEIR GOALS

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Just a couple of weeks ago, at a delegate breakfast at the Democratic National Convention, Colorado Democrats were openly predicting a pick-up of four — or more — seats in the Colorado House of Representatives this November.

The prediction might have been a tad optimistic even then, considering that Democrats already hold a 40- to 25-seat lead in a state where Republicans hold the advantage in voter registration.

Following the money to the battleground races for state Legislature

It’s difficult to tell exactly where House Republicans are putting their money this year, since expenditures from their 527 group, the Colorado Leadership Fund, can’t be traced to specific races. The expenditures are going largely to various campaign mailing companies, according to state records.

‘No on 48’ kicks off pro-choice campaign to defeat ‘Personhood’ amendment

Measure would give legal status to embryos

By John Schroyer
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Warning of unintended legal side effects, dozens of opponents of the controversial “personhood” amendment rallied Wednesday on Denver’s Auraria campus to kick off their official campaign against Amendment 48.

Fofi Mendez, the “No on 48” campaign director, described the amendment’s backers as “a narrow minority with an extreme political view,” and said the measure, which would redefine “person” in the Colorado Constitution to include fertilized eggs, “simply goes too far.”

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Sarah Palin's nomination for Vice President has changed the dynamics of the presidential race.

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

When John McCain introduced Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his Republican running mate, he swiped and switched Barack Obama’s campaign mantra, “McCain: More of the same.” The Republican presidential campaign ticket’s latest TV ad assaults Obama’s change message as “more of the same.”

McCain asks Americans to fight for change and peace

Democrats question the GOP ticket

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

After a video of John McCain’s biography ended, the crowd erupted with whistles, whoops and applause in the darkness lit by flashing cameras.

McCain walked onto the stage, the lights rose and thunderous applause filled the Xcel Center.

“USA, USA, USA,” chanted the Republican delegates.

Media frenzy over Veep pick Palin at RNC

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

“Drill, baby, drill!” shouted the National Republican Convention floor delegates in support of GOP vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin’s push to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to solve the energy crisis.

In the media press boxes closer to the Xcel Center steel rafters, the message might have been garbled and heard as, “Grill, Palin, grill!”

Measures weigh down November ballot

Coloradans face 18 questions

By John Schroyer
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

In addition to the presidential race and Colorado’s open U.S. Senate seat, in this election Coloradans also will face 18 separate statewide ballot questions on issues ranging from a ban on affirmative action to a series of pro- and anti- organized labor measures.

The West offers road to power, Dems insist

Obama up and ready, McCain motionless

By John Schroyer
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Top Western Democrats spent much of last week extolling “the New West” as the “road to the White House.” During a conference call Thursday morning, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said the Democrats’ ground game gives them a major advantage over the Republicans.

Schaffer detours immigration forum to defense

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

COLORADO SPRINGS — A forum on immigration issues took an immediate detour when former Republican Congressman Bob Schaffer trampled Democratic Congressman Mark Udall’s 10-year record on defense issues. Schaffer accused his U.S. Senate opponent of taking positions that showed disregard for both national defense and the economy in El Paso County, home to five military installations.

Energy alternatives dominate debate as Udall and Schaffer face-offs continue

Third-party candidates add spice to mix

By John Schroyer
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Energy is becoming the cornerstone issue of Colorado’s U.S. Senate debate, and that was highlighted several times last week as each candidate tried to show how flexible he is. Democrat Mark Udall tried to convince voters that he’s a moderate Democrat who’s open to offshore drilling and nuclear energy, while Republican Bob Schaffer repeatedly insisted that he’s a big fan of renewable energy.