2008 Political Campaigns

Amendment 48

Opposition galvanizes Democrats, Republicans

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

DENVER — Governor Bill Ritter joined growing bi-partisan opposition to Amendment 48 that seeks to redefine a person from the moment of birth to the instant of egg fertilization. The amendment would grant protections under the state constitution to the unborn, but would also trigger an expensive landslide of legal entanglements.

Jabs sheds camouflage, shows right-to-work stripes

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

In his autobiography, An American Tiger, Jake Jabs writes that he briefly explored a bid for the U.S. Senate in 1985, only to decide against it.

In retrospect, wrote the iconic owner of American Furniture Warehouse, he probably wasn’t cut out for the job.

“Those who know me understand I’m very outspoken,” Jabs said. “I would not have the stomach nor the patience for politics. I’ve called my own shots since I was 24, and you can’t do that in politics.”

‘Poison pill’ measures pulled from ballot

Businesses pledge $3 million to fight 'right to work'

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Colorado labor and business leaders announced a deal Thursday morning to remove four pro-labor ballot initiatives that some feared would cripple the state’s economy.

In exchange, a coalition of businesses will provide $3 million to fight the so-called “right to work” ballot initiative and two others that are backed by some members of the business community, but which other members say would upset Colorado’s delicate balance between labor and business interests.

Pro-life mailer irks pro-choice Republicans

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

COLORADO SPRINGS — A heavyweight brochure with a photo of a woman cuddling a sleeping baby recently arrived in the mailboxes of thousands of registered Republican voters. Its “vote pro-life” message hit some recipients like a ton of bricks.

‘Meet the Press’ airs debate interruptus

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

It’s “one of the hottest U.S. Senate races” in the nation, according to Meet the Press, and U.S. Rep. Mark Udall and former U.S. Rep. Bob Schaffer didn’t disappoint any viewers who were looking for fireworks.

From the second host Tom Brokaw eloquently welcomed the duo and called Schaffer, “Congressman” because it is “appropriate protocol,” the gloves were off — and so were any rules of engagement.

HD 56 debate pits bold Hasan against diligent Scanlan

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

The work of Colorado legislators often involves incremental changes — tinkering around the edges to achieve what can be achieved, without raising taxes. The Legislature, after all, cannot raise taxes in Colorado without a public vote.

McCain courts Colorado women’s votes

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

DENVER — When Republican presidential candidate John McCain strode onto the stage in the Sheraton Hotel’s Grand Ballroom, he was greeted by hundreds of screaming, whistling and applauding women.

Obama campaign hits the ground rewriting

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

“Today, Democrats and Republicans in Washington have agreed on an emergency rescue plan that is our best and only way to prevent an economic catastrophe.”

That’s what Sen. Barack Obama had planned to tell his audience of about 2,500 at a rally at Mountain Range High School in Westminster last Monday morning, according to the text of prepared remarks the Obama campaign already had sent to reporters.

GOP, Dems exchange fraud accusations

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Colorado is a critical swing state in the presidential election, and the battle for votes between the Democratic and Republican parties is escalating here.

And, as voter registration drives escalate, cries of “foul play” are being heard from both major political parties.

Both state parties held press conferences Sept. 24 alleging irregularities in voter registration in Colorado.

Ballot measures create daunting task

By John Schroyer
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Colorado voters will face the longest ballot in the United States this election. That’s because in addition to offering choices for president, U.S. senator and various state and local officials, our ballot is burdened with an overwhelming 18 ballot questions.