2008 Political Campaigns

Veiled political groups shape Senate races

Mudslingers revving up for 2010

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Most Colorado Republicans admit it will be virtually impossible to pick up the three seats needed to take control of the Colorado Senate in 2008. The Republican goal, by most accounts, is to win back those seats by 2010 — just in time for the next round of redistricting.

But both the Republicans and the Democrats — who hope to keep their current five-seat advantage in the Senate — have begun laying the groundwork for 2010’s redistricting in 2008.

Musgrave in uphill fight to keep CD 4

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

In a campaign that’s had more than its fair share of inflammatory rhetoric, there’s apparently one word neither candidate in the 4th Congressional District is willing to use.

During the first CD 4 debate Oct. 8, moderator Adam Schrager asked Democrat Betsy Markey and Republican Congresswoman Marilyn Musgrave if either one thinks her opponent is corrupt.

“No,” Markey said. “No, I don’t think my opponent is corrupt. But I do think the record speaks for itself.”

Jeffco school issue campaign counters ballot-book ‘satire’

By Jon Lloyd
SPECIAL TO THE COLORADO STATESMAN

On Saturday, Mary Tedford and hundreds of other volunteers will be walking door to door in Jefferson County, asking neighbors to approve two Jefferson County Schools ballot issues.

Did election pressure cause candidates to bail on bailout?

Udall and Schaffer debate on leadership

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Democratic Rep. Mark Udall voted twice against the financial rescue package that finally passed Congress Oct. 3. His opponent in the race for the U.S. Senate, Republican former congressman Bob Schaffer, says he probably would have voted against the bill, too.

Amendment 48

Opposition galvanizes Democrats, Republicans

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

DENVER — Governor Bill Ritter joined growing bi-partisan opposition to Amendment 48 that seeks to redefine a person from the moment of birth to the instant of egg fertilization. The amendment would grant protections under the state constitution to the unborn, but would also trigger an expensive landslide of legal entanglements.

Jabs sheds camouflage, shows right-to-work stripes

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

In his autobiography, An American Tiger, Jake Jabs writes that he briefly explored a bid for the U.S. Senate in 1985, only to decide against it.

In retrospect, wrote the iconic owner of American Furniture Warehouse, he probably wasn’t cut out for the job.

“Those who know me understand I’m very outspoken,” Jabs said. “I would not have the stomach nor the patience for politics. I’ve called my own shots since I was 24, and you can’t do that in politics.”

‘Poison pill’ measures pulled from ballot

Businesses pledge $3 million to fight 'right to work'

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Colorado labor and business leaders announced a deal Thursday morning to remove four pro-labor ballot initiatives that some feared would cripple the state’s economy.

In exchange, a coalition of businesses will provide $3 million to fight the so-called “right to work” ballot initiative and two others that are backed by some members of the business community, but which other members say would upset Colorado’s delicate balance between labor and business interests.

Pro-life mailer irks pro-choice Republicans

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

COLORADO SPRINGS — A heavyweight brochure with a photo of a woman cuddling a sleeping baby recently arrived in the mailboxes of thousands of registered Republican voters. Its “vote pro-life” message hit some recipients like a ton of bricks.

‘Meet the Press’ airs debate interruptus

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

It’s “one of the hottest U.S. Senate races” in the nation, according to Meet the Press, and U.S. Rep. Mark Udall and former U.S. Rep. Bob Schaffer didn’t disappoint any viewers who were looking for fireworks.

From the second host Tom Brokaw eloquently welcomed the duo and called Schaffer, “Congressman” because it is “appropriate protocol,” the gloves were off — and so were any rules of engagement.

HD 56 debate pits bold Hasan against diligent Scanlan

By Chris Bragg
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

The work of Colorado legislators often involves incremental changes — tinkering around the edges to achieve what can be achieved, without raising taxes. The Legislature, after all, cannot raise taxes in Colorado without a public vote.