2010 Political Campaigns

Fireworks erupt in this year’s Salazar vs. Tipton race in CD 3

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Republican state Rep. Scott Tipton aims to unseat Democratic 3rd District Congressman John Salazar — a feat the businessman attempted unsuccessfully in 2006 — and hopes to ride the wave of anti-government sentiment to victory. Salazar, who calls himself “a veteran and lifelong farmer,” has earned a Teflon reputation as an advocate for rural communities.

New face in state senate, new candidate for statehouse

By Anthony Bowe
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

The conversation with constituents has changed for Senate District 3 candidate Angela Giron but only slightly. Giron, 50, said she still isn’t used to being called “senator” after being sworn into office last Friday to the state senate seat held by former Sen. Abel Tapia, D-Pueblo.

Buck wins GOP nomination for Senate

Weld County District Attorney Ken Buck, a relative political neophyte next to mainstream Republican rival Jane Norton, took the slow and steady approach to his Senate primary victory during a year and a half of grassroots campaigning. At one point last year, after former Lieutenant Governor Norton jumped into the race at the urging of some powerful Republican officials, Buck considered dropping out.

Senate smackdown staggers Democrats

By Miller Hudson
CONTRIBUTING WRITER

When Ken Salazar accepted the President’s invitation to run the Department of Interior he could not have anticipated he was about to set loose the dogs in Colorado’s Democratic kennel. In past years the Governor would have huddled with Salazar, the party chair, the Democratic Congressional delegation, a handful of major donors and presto, a replacement would have been unveiled a few days later.

Dems bury hatchet on Capitol steps, take aim at Buck

By Ernest Luning
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

DENVER — The two Democrats who battled it out for the Senate nomination for nearly a year joined hands two days after the primary on the steps of the State Capitol and vowed to work to keep appointed Sen. Michael Bennet in office.

Wadhams says GOP doesn’t need a ‘Kumbaya’ rally

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

Kiss goodbye the old tradition of statewide Republican candidates making the hop-and-drop tour of county party unity rallies. The goal had been to unite Republicans behind the winning candidates in divisive primary races.

Norton loses to Buck but promises unity

By Marianne Goodland
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

LITTLETON — By 10 p.m. Tuesday night, the ballroom at the Park Meadows Marriott was left to a few reporters and hotel staff cleaning up the room. Purple balloons still hung high in the air, tethered to tables around the room, seemingly waiting for a celebration that would never come. A stack of “Jane Norton for Colorado” signs at the ballroom’s entrance laid on a table, mostly untouched.

Hard-fought Senate primary gives Bennet the win

Romanoff concedes, urges support of his former rival

By Ernest Luning
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

DENVER — After a hard-fought Democratic primary campaign that began late last summer and had all the appearances of a potential upset, former Colorado House Speaker Andrew Romanoff’s challenge to Sen. Michael Bennet was over just an hour after the polls closed.

Maes credits God & the grassroots in GOP win

GOP nominee tells Tancredo to quit race for governor

By Leslie Jorgensen
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

In the year of outsider versus insider political candidates, Republican gubernatorial candidate Dan Maes credited his primary win over former 3rd District Congressman Scott McInnis to God and faithful grassroots voters — and criticized unnamed GOP bosses for conspiring to manipulate him out of the race.

Stapleton tops Ament in GOP treasurer’s primary

By Anthony Bowe
THE COLORADO STATESMAN

GREENWOOD VILLAGE — Walker Stapleton, the Republican candidate for state treasurer, exerted cool confidence Tuesday night while leading his primary opponent J.J. Ament by only two percentage points with three quarters of Colorado precincts reporting in. Asked if he were nervous, as a slow trickle of voting results began to knife into his slim lead, Stapleton’s smile disappeared, and he firmly answered “no.” Seconds later, his wry smile returned.